Thursday, April 22, 2010

In Which Maggie Is a Slacker with Foreign Covers

I promise I will have Actual Blog Posts with Actual Content soon, but I just got back from New Orleans and my brain is tapioca pudding. I did just get a lovely box of foreign editions from several publishers, though, so I thought I'd show them off.

They're Catalan, French, Hungarian, and Bulgarian, respectively. Do I have any blog readers who speak any of those languages?

Also, German readers can vote for their favorite cover here. I have my distinct preference for that one . . .












I'm also way behind on blog comment answering, something that will be rectified Very Shortly.

10 comments:

Lora said...

I'm Bulgarian and I have to tell you I absolutely love our cover of Shiver. The translation is literal, if you wonder.
The translation of the book itself is good but I prefer the original - English. Love the other covers as well. Can't wait for Linger!

The Graef Family! said...

I love the second one! That must be so cool to see YOUR book in different langues!

Juan Nicolás Tineo said...

Sorry, but I just speak Spanish. Nice to meet you. I like your blog.

Maggie Stiefvater said...

That is so fascinating to me, Lora -- thank you for letting me know! I love the Bulgarian cover too but of course I don't know anything about the translation!

@the Graef Family -- yes, it's amazing -- one of my favorite parts of this process.

@Juan -- Thank you!

DJ's Life in Fiction said...

I really like the Bulgarian cover. I'm going to try and track down the Spanish edition to read and see how it compares to the English. Maybe I'll write another review for it, but in Spanish. :)

By the way, thank you so much for tweeting about my giveaway! It means a lot.

Maggie Stiefvater said...

It's a nice giveaway. :)

Lothfleur said...

I speak French (I'm French!) and I can read Spanish but it's not Catalan, I know.
In the French translation of Shiver, they made the difference between Sam and Grace even more obvious by using two different tenses (in French we have two tenses that correspond to the preterit). Then, it's pretty like every other translation. We still have sentences that look like they've been translated word for word and that are rather strange.

Maggie Stiefvater said...

That's fascinating. The only one I'll be able to read is the German, so it'll be interesting to see the translation foibles in that one.

Lothfleur said...

Translations have something fascinating but there are times when they are just plain irritating. I usually don't read French translations because I can't help noticing the broken collocations, the sentences translated word for word... Sometimes it feels like the book is badly written, and well, it gets on my nerves. But, hopefully everybody's not like me, and there are translators who make amazing translations.

LanrieBoo said...

Maggie . . . If i may call you that ....
What does the first ine say ??

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